Fresh off a trip to Europe in May, Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal has begun planning a business mission to Asia for October.

The governor will lead a state delegation to China and South Korea, Chris Cummiskey, commissioner of the Georgia Department of Economic Development, told GlobalAtlanta.

The objectives will be similar to those of Mr. Deal's two-week visit to England, Germany and Austria, which was focused on luring new companies and thanking those that have already invested in Georgia, Mr. Cummiskey said.

While not as flashy as new factories or relocations, company expansions play a crucial role in job creation in the state.

JCB Inc., a British heavy equipment maker, soon plans to add 200 jobs at its North American factory in Savannah. Mr. Deal and Mr. Cummiskey visited the company's headquarters in Rocester, England, on last month's trip, Mr. Deal's first overseas mission as governor.

The Asia trip will also include meetings with government officials, said Mr. Cummiskey, who plans to participate.

Details of the itinerary are still developing, but the mission should at least include stops at the state's economic offices in Beijing and Seoul, according to Alison Tyrer, a department spokeswoman.

Sonny Perdue, Mr. Deal's predecessor, traveled on 21 missions to 25 countries in eight years. Mr. Perdue opened the state's office in China in 2008 and visited the country twice more. He also traveled twice to Korea - once before Kia Motors had selected Georgia for $1.2 billion plant and again after the project was underway.

Related: Gov. Deal Leading Delegation to Europe

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