<p>Outgoing&nbsp;University of Georgia&nbsp;President&nbsp;Michael Adams, right, met with David Adelman, U.S. ambassador to Singapore, left, and his wife, Caroline.&nbsp;</p>

Outgoing University of Georgia President Michael Adams, right, met with David Adelman, U.S. ambassador to Singapore, left, and his wife, Caroline. 

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Outgoing University of Georgia President Michael Adams and other university leaders are on a three-city tour in Asia to reach out to alumni and float ideas for new partnerships in the region. 

Dr. Adams, Tom Landrum, executive vice president for external affairs are visiting SingaporeHong Kong and Tokyo, each of which will host alumni events during the trip.  

Noel Fallows, associate dean of the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, and Jane Gatewood, director of international partnerships, are joining the events in Singapore and Hong Kong. 

"UGA has a large number of alumni living in the region positioned in a variety of industry and governmental posts, and UGA is hosting the events as one way to continue to engage its alumni with UGA and the state of Georgia," Dr. Gatewood told Global Atlanta in an email from the trip. "In addition, the events serve as a way to introduce UGA to entities and individuals in the three cities who may be less familiar with the institution, furthering its global resonance and engagement."

On the trip, Dr. Gatewood and Dr. Fallows met with representatives from the National University of Singapore to iron out the details of a newly signed partnership between the two institutions to foster student and faculty exchange, as well as collaborative programs and degrees, Dr. Gatewood said.  

The group was also slated to meet with U.S. embassy officials in each city. 

David Adelman, U.S. ambassador to Singapore, received a bachelor's degree from UGA before going on to receive a master's in public administration from Georgia State University and a law degree from Emory University. The former state senator from Decatur and corporate attorney spoke at the University of Georgia summer commencement ceremony in 2010. 

More on ambassador Adelman here.  

 

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