<p>From left to right: Nurettin Yildirim, governor of Burdur province in southwest Turkey; Fatih Han Unal, parliamentarian from Ordu province on the Black Sea; Mona Diamond, Turkey's honorary consul general to Georgia; Gov. Nathan Deal with a Turkish vase presented to him by the delegation; Hami Yildirim, parliamentarian from Burdur and Turan Kilic, executive director of the Istanbul Center.</p>

From left to right: Nurettin Yildirim, governor of Burdur province in southwest Turkey; Fatih Han Unal, parliamentarian from Ordu province on the Black Sea; Mona Diamond, Turkey's honorary consul general to Georgia; Gov. Nathan Deal with a Turkish vase presented to him by the delegation; Hami Yildirim, parliamentarian from Burdur and Turan Kilic, executive director of the Istanbul Center.

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Officials from Turkey’s government as well as a Turkish business association from the province of Antalya on the Mediterranean attended the 4th annual Turkish American Day held at the Georgia Capitol on Feb. 7.

Hami Yildirim and Fatih Han Unal, representatives from Turkey’s parliament, expressed their appreciation to Georgia legislators for passing a series of resolutions recognizing the work of local Turkish organizations.

Mona Diamond, Turkey’s honorary consul general to Georgia, referred to growing business ties between Turkey and Georgia since Gov. Nathan Deal visited Turkey with a state delegation last year.

Resolutions were passed recognizing the work of the Istanbul Center, originally established in 2002 as part of the Global Spectrum Foundation to promote a better understanding and closer relations between individuals and communities in Atlanta and the Southeast;

the Turkish American Chamber of the Commerce of the Southeast U.S., founded in 2007 to facilitate commerce between the U.S. and Turkey;

and the Turkic American Federation of the Southeast including Turkic organizations in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee to improve the relationship between Turkic and American communities through educational, cultural and business activities.

Should President Obama’s fragile nuclear deal with Iran survive the partisan vitriol it’s already ignited in Congress, companies in some of Georgia’s strongest sectors could be primed to tap a market of nearly 80 million consumers hungry to reconnect with the world economy, experts told Global Atlanta.   More
Atlantans next week have the chance to meet the group managing the construction and eventual operation of the New Istanbul Airport, which seeks to eventually dethrone Hartsfield-Jackson as the world’s busiest.  More