<p>Thirteen-year-old  Susan Awino (left) pours water with another student from the well into a  container for handwashing. Students  at Ogwodo Primary School in Sidho, Kenya, fill containers each morning  for handwashing and drinking water. CARE assists governments and other  partners in Kenya, Zambia and Mali with water and sanitation in schools  to give girls like Susan a better chance at  finishing their education.</p>

Thirteen-year-old Susan Awino (left) pours water with another student from the well into a container for handwashing. Students at Ogwodo Primary School in Sidho, Kenya, fill containers each morning for handwashing and drinking water. CARE assists governments and other partners in Kenya, Zambia and Mali with water and sanitation in schools to give girls like Susan a better chance at finishing their education.

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A panel of medical authorities is to address global concerns for water and sanitation needs in honor of “World Water Day” at Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health on Tuesday, April 9, from 5-6:30 p.m.

The United Nations designated in 1993 the annual World Water Day event to address the importance of communities to focus on their water resources and the care of these resources.

“The U.S. made significant investments in providing safe water and adequate sanitation throughout the country in the early 1900s which dramatically improved the health of all Americans,” said Michael Beach, associate director for healthy water in the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control, in a news release.

“The tremendous benefits resulting from those investments show how important it is for us to commit to working with developing countries around the world to support their efforts in providing safe water and adequate sanitation to their populations.

Jeffrey Koplan, vice president for Global Health at Emory and former director of the CDC, is to moderate the panel. Panelists are to include David Addiss, director of the Children Without Worms program at the Task Force for Global Health; Lourdes Mindreau, program coordinator of CARE Peru’s Water and Sanitation Programme; Christine Moe, director of the Center for Global Safe Water at Emory’s Rollins School of Public Health and Robert Tauxe, deputy director of the Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases at the CDC.

The panelists are involved in many projects to improve water and sanitation, such as eradicating harmful parasites found in stagnant water, leading the global fight against cholera and tropical disease control and training the next generation of water and sanitation professionals on effective strategies and technologies.

Last year the World Affairs Council of Atlanta, CARE USA and the Washington-based Center for Strategic and International Studies teamed up on May 21 to host a global health conference focused on water issues.

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