The People’s Bank of China has awarded NCR Corp. a five-year agreement to provide on-site technical support and maintenance services for its Shanghai Automatic Clearing Centre, one of the largest intra-city check clearing centers in China.

According to an April 17 news release, NCR is to be responsible for ensuring that the bank can “accurately and timely complete the average daily clearing of 100,000 checks.”

Jimmy Zheng, general manager for NCR Services in Greater China, said in the release that NCR built the first check clearing system for the bank’s Guangzhou branch in 1996.

“By continuing our relationship with the People’s Bank of China’s Shanghai Automatic Clearing Centre, we are demonstrating NCR’s strength in just one of our many service offerings to financial services companies in China,” he added.

NCR’s customers for its payment solutions currently include the bank’s headquarters business division, its Shanghai headquarters and more than ten of its regional branches.

It also services the following banks: Bank of China, Agricultural Bank of China, Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, China Construction Bank, Bank of Communications and others in Shanghai, Nanjing and Central China.

NCR is a global technology company based in Duluth. For more information, contact Winnie Sze or Yanping Wang at their emails, Winnie.sze@ncr.com or yanping.wang@ncr.com

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