<p>Urbanization is seen as a key to raising China&rsquo;s income levels and fixing its environmental woes, though many believe a real estate bubble in major urban areas threatens the country's stability.&nbsp;</p>

Urbanization is seen as a key to raising China’s income levels and fixing its environmental woes, though many believe a real estate bubble in major urban areas threatens the country's stability. 

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Georgia Institute of Technology and a prominent Shanghai university are teaming up to help China build smarter, cleaner cities as the nation’s unprecedented march toward urbanization continues. 

Tech’s College of Architecture is partnering with Tongji University to launch the Sino-U.S. Joint Laboratory for Ecological Urban Design, or the Eco Urban Lab. 

Involving researchers from both universities, the lab will focus on urban modeling, benchmarking the performance of Chinese and U.S. cities and issues created by rapid urban transition. 

Perry Yang, associate professor at Georgia Tech and faculty member at Tongji’s College of Architecture and Urban Planning, will lead the joint lab, which will be located on Tongji’s campus but will have facilities at both universities. Dr. Yang and Georgia Tech College of Architecture Dean Steve French traveled to China to launch the lab. 

Plans are in the works for student and faculty exchanges through the partnership, which is the continuation of a relationship that kicked off in 2010. 

A $4.2 million grant has been award to researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology’s College of Computing in an effort to develop programs that will improve cybersecurity, especially for online banking, shopping and trading transactions. More
Editor's note: Since the first segment of the interview with Georgia State University scholars Shawn Powers and Michael Jablonski, authors of the Real Cyber War, earlier this week, a breach of the computer systems of United Airlines, the world's second largest airline, was detected. The same group of China-backed hackers that allegedly obtained the security-clearance records from the U.S. Office of Personnel are the prime suspects once again. In Part II of the interview, the authors discuss China's development of the Internet, the use of the Internet in developing countries such as Kenya and Tanzania, Atlanta's prospects as a cybersecurity center of development and the future of Google and the Internet more generally. Click here to see Part I of the interview. More